Jags’ Wilson on Henry: ‘Definitely not trying to be on no stiff-arm tape’

Anytime you prepare for the Tennessee Titans, you have to strategize and do everything in your power to stop RB Derrick Henry. The NFL’s leading rusher is having another big-time season. In 12 games, Henry has rushed for 1317 yards and 12 touchdowns. Along the way, there have been many highlight-reel runs, which includes that legendary stiff-arm. 

At 6-3, 247 pounds, Henry packs a punch and is very difficult to bring down. Jaguars S Jarrod Wilson knows firsthand what it’s like to tackle Henry, and he and his Jaguars(1-11) will have to do their best to get Henry to the ground on Sunday when they host the Tennessee Titans(8-4).

“We know this guy. We know this guy’s going to get the football a lot, and he’s coming downhill,” Wilson said about Henry. “We definitely have to execute, stay in our gaps, being just discipline in the run game. That’s a big thing for us is to definitely knock out this run. We know he’s getting the ball, so it’s really just man on man, trying to match up and do our job on Sunday.”

Jaguars DE Dawuane Smoot added on Henry: “I mean if you haven’t noticed his numbers go crazy like halfway through the season. It’s a mindset. We just have to put our body on him at the end of the day. We have to really hit him and kind of wrap him up and try to get as [many] people to him as possible.”

Like everybody else on the Jaguars, Wilson hopes to avoid being a victim of Henry’s stiff-arm.

“He’s coming around the edge at 250 pounds at 6-4, so he already has that length advantage,” Wilson said. “But, I’m not trying to be on that tape. [I’m] trying to cut his legs down, get him down the best way I can. Definitely not trying to be on no stiff-arm tape.”

In the first game between the two teams, the Jaguars held Henry to 84 yards and less than 4.0 yards a carry, but Jacksonville would lose to the Titans 33-30. So, if the Jaguars can control Henry, maybe they could put themselves in a position to end their 11-game losing streak, but if they can’t control Henry, it could be another long day for Jacksonville.

Prescott, Ngakoue, Henry, Green get Franchise tag

Franchise and transition player designations were announced today ​​for the 2020 NFL free agency signing period, which begins at 4:00 p.m. ET on Wednesday, March 18.

A club can designate one “franchise” player or one “transition” player among its veteran free agents.

The salary offer by a player’s club determines whether the franchise player designation is exclusive or non-exclusive.

An “exclusive” franchise player – not free to sign with another club – is offered the greater of (i) the average of the top five salaries at the player’s position for the current year as of the end of the restricted free agent signing period on April 17; or (ii) the amount of the required tender for a “non-exclusive” franchise player, as explained below.

Article 10, Section 2(a)(i) of the CBA sets forth the methodology, known as the “Cap Percentage Average,” for calculating the required tender for such a player:​

The Nonexclusive Franchise Tender shall be a one year NFL Player Contract for (A) the average of the five largest Prior Year Salaries for players at the position . . . at which the Franchise Player participated in the most plays during the prior League Year, which average shall be calculated by: (1) summing the amounts of the Franchise Tags for players at that position for the five preceding League Years; (2) dividing the resulting amount by the sum of the Salary Caps for the five preceding League Years . . . ; and (3) multiplying the resulting percentage by the Salary Cap for the upcoming League Year . . . (the “Cap Percentage Average”) . . . ; or (B) 120% of his Prior Year Salary, whichever is greater . . . .

​If a club extends a required tender to a non-exclusive franchise player pursuant to this section, the player shall be permitted to negotiate a player contract with any club, except that draft choice compensation of two first-round draft selections shall be made in the event he signs with a new club.

The signing period for franchise players begins at 4:00 p.m. (ET) on March 18 and ends on the Tuesday following the 10th week of the season (November 17).​

This year, one player (Dak Prescott, Dallas) was designated as an exclusive franchise player.  Thirteen players were designated as non-exclusive franchise players.

2020 FRANCHISE PLAYERS

Club

Player

Position

Baltimore Ravens

Matthew ​Judon

LB

Cincinnati Bengals

A.J. Green

WR

Dallas Cowboys

Dak Prescott*

QB

Denver Broncos

Justin Simmons

S

Jacksonville Jaguars

Yannick Ngakoue

DE

Kansas City Chiefs

Chris Jones

DT

Los Angeles Chargers

Hunter Henry

TE

Minnesota Vikings

Anthony Harris

S

New England Patriots

Joe Thuney

OL

New York Giants

Leonard Williams

DT

Pittsburgh Steelers

Bud Dupree

LB

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Shaquil Barrett

LB

Tennessee Titans

Derrick Henry

RB

Washington Redskins

Brandon Scherff

OL

*Denotes Exclusive Franchise Player

A transition player is offered the greater of (i) the average of the top 10 prior year salaries at the player’s position, which average is calculated using the same methodology used for non-exclusive franchise players (the Cap Percentage Average); or (ii) 120% of his prior year salary.

If a club extends a required tender to a transition player, the player shall be permitted to negotiate a contract with any club subject to his prior club’s right of first refusal, except that no draft choice compensation shall be made with respect to such player if his prior club declines to exercise its right of first refusal.

The signing period for transition players begins at 4:00 p.m. (ET) on March 18 and ends on July 22.  After July 22 and until 4:00p.m. (ET) on the Tuesday following the 10th week of the season (November 17), the prior club has exclusive negotiating rights.

This year, one player was designated as a transition player:​

Club

Player

Position

Arizona Cardinals

Kenyan Drake

RB

The Salary Cap for the 2020 league year has been set at $198,200,000 per club. The resulting 2020 Cap Percentage Average (“CPA”) tenders for non-exclusive franchise players and transition players are as follows:

                             NON-EXCLUSIVE FRANCHISE PLAYERS

Position

Tender Amount

Quarterback

$ 26,824,000

Running Back

$ 10,278,000

Wide Receiver

$ 17,865,000

Tight End

$ 10,607,000

Offensive Linemen

$ 14,781,000

Defensive End

$ 17,788,000

Defensive Tackle

$ 16,126,000

Linebacker

$ 15,828,000

Cornerback

$ 16,338,000

Safety

$ 11,441,000

Kicker/Punter

$   5,019,000

​                  TRANSITION PLAYERS​

Position

Tender Amount

Quarterback

$ 24,837,000

Running Back

$   8,483,000

Wide Receiver

$ 15,680,000

Tight End

$   9,117,000

Offensive Linemen

$ 13,505,000

Defensive End

$ 15,184,000

Defensive Tackle

$ 13,143,000

Linebacker

$ 13,737,000

Cornerback

$ 14,197,000

Safety

$   9,860,000

Kicker/Punter

$   4,559,000

Henry: ‘We were in the huddle, they were like, ‘You got to break a 99-yard’

Titans RB Derrick Henry is one of the unlikeliest players to have a 99-yard TD run, but Thursday night in Tennessee, Henry used his stiff-arm to rumble 99 yards to pay dirt as the Titans routed the Jaguars 30-9.

The third-year RB matched Tony Dorsett’s 99-yarder against the Vikings in 1983. Henry would finish the night with 238 yards and four touchdowns.

After the game, Henry, Titans head coach Mike Vrabel, and Titans QB Marcus Mariota described what they saw on that 99-yard TD run:

Titans head coach Mike Vrabel:

(on what he saw specifically on the 99-yard run by Derrick Henry)

“He just ran out of guys to stiff arm. Just be careful getting too close to him, because I think I saw three of them from the 30 on. He’s been great, because it hasn’t been perfect. I think his attitude has been great. I think when you’re not doing things well as a team, or as an offense, or defense, or special teams, you know, there’s an opportunity to get frustrated with what’s going on. But, I think you just keep working and staying the course, and I think that’s what we did tonight. We had a good week of practice. These guys were focused. This isn’t easy to come back a few days later, felt like you slept twice, and it was time for the game.”

Titans QB Marcus Mariota:

(on the stiff arms Derrick Henry delivered to the Jaguars defense on his 99-yard touchdown)

“It was incredible. There is nothing like it. To be honest with you, it looked like it got bottled up and then he found his way out of it. Once that guy gets in the open field, he’s so hard to bring down. It is, it’s a treat to watch.”

Titans RB Derrick Henry:

(on how he felt on the 99-yard touchdown run)

“Trying to catch my breath. No, I’m just kidding. It’s so crazy, because before when we were in the huddle, they were like, ‘You got to break a 99-yard.’ My main focus is to get positive yards, but when I had the ball and I got it, I just saw it and I just hit it. My stiff arm was working, so that’s all about that. But, like I said, it started upfront with those guys. All of us, 11 of us, executing that play for that to happen.”

 (on what he heard on the Titans sideline after he scored a 99-yard touchdown)

“Everybody was just going crazy. I’m trying to hit helmets with everybody, dap everybody up. It was a crazy play. Like I said, us as a whole, we executed that.”

(on what he did with the ball from the 99-yard run)

“I’m definitely going to keep mine. When I see Tony (Dorsett) again, you know, I got to spend a lot of time with him when I was at the Heisman. You know, he’s a legend. It’s cool to be in that company with Tony (Dorsett).”