Jaron Ennis: ‘I will be a world champion in 2021!’

Exciting unbeaten welterweight Jaron “Boots” Ennis will look to continue his 16-fight knockout streak when he faces veteran Chris van Heerden in the 12-round co-main event live on SHOWTIME (9 p.m. ET/6 p.m. PT) Saturday, December 19 from the Mohegan Sun in Uncasville, Conn., in an event presented by Premier Boxing Champions.

Ennis (26-0, 24 KOs) faces the all-action South African native van Heerden (28-2-1, 12 KOs), who is on a bit of a roll himself winning 14 of his last 15 fights since his first professional defeat in 2010.

Ennis, who made his SHOWTIME debut in 2018 on ShoBox: The New Generation, is trained by his father Bozy Ennis at Bozy’s Dungeon in Philadelphia, Pa.

“I’ve been sparring with some of my dad’s fighters, but we’ve had trouble finding guys to spar because of the virus,” said Ennis. “We just want to keep everyone safe and healthy. But we’re definitely ready. I’m ready to rock and roll and keep my knockout streak going with No. 17 on December 19.”

Ennis is currently ranked WBO No. 7, IBF No. 10 and WBC No. 11 at 147 pounds. He knows he competes in boxing’s glamour division with superstars like Errol Spence Jr., Terence Crawford, Manny Pacquiao, Shawn Porter, Keith Thurman and Danny Garcia.

“I just want to fight the world champions,” said the power-punching Ennis, who has recorded 16 knockdowns in his last seven fights. “I want to fight the top five guys. I’m ready, and I’ve been ready to make a big statement. I just have to stay focused and do what I have to do and handle my business and then it’s on to bigger and better things.”

Even though his last seven fights were scheduled for 10 rounds, Ennis has only gone six rounds once in his professional career. “We prepare ourselves for 12, 15 rounds,” he said. “I can go all day long. I get stronger as the fight goes on. I know people haven’t gotten to see that side of me yet. If it goes past six rounds, then I’m in shape for it. I’m always in shape, and I’m ready to go. No matter many rounds I have to go.”

Ennis believes that a big fight against a top 147-pounder is in his near future. “At the end of the day people are seeing that it’s not my fault I’m not getting these big fights,” he said. “These guys are hopping around me and don’t want to fight me. I can only fight who they put in front of me. I definitely think I need to make a big statement on December 19 so that in 2021 I can start getting the big fights. I will be a world champion in 2021!”

Ennis is a natural right-hander who fights from the southpaw stance. “Everybody knows I love to fight southpaws,” he said. “Early in my career I fought four or five southpaws back-to-back. I love it. It’s easy for me and they don’t give me any problems. I know southpaws don’t like fighting other southpaws, but I love fighting them.”

Lubin on Charlo: ‘I’m ready for a rematch if he can take care of business like I did’

Erickson “The Hammer” Lubin out-classed Terrell Gausha in a WBC Super Welterweight Title Eliminator to set up a matchup with the winner of the Jermell Charlo vs. Jeison Rosario unification bout, part of next week’s CHARLO DOUBLEHEADER on SHOWTIME PPV. Lubin won via unanimous decision (115-113, 116-112, 118-110) in the main event of an exciting night of boxing live on SHOWTIME Saturday night from Mohegan Sun Arena in Uncasville, Conn., in an event presented by Premier Boxing Champions. (For highlights, click HERE)

After a slow start to the SHOWTIME BOXING: SPECIAL EDITION® tripleheader main event, the 24-year-old Lubin (23-1, 16 KOs) did enough to win after a more action-packed fight broke out in the eighth round. Lubin, who was wobbled in the tenth round, pressed to close the show in the final round against a game Gausha, who refused to go down. Orlando’s Lubin landed an average of 12 out of 48 punches per round to 9 of 40 for Gausha (21-2-1, 10 KOs), and landed 47 percent of his power punches in the fight.

If Charlo is victorious in next week’s unification bout, Lubin will get his much-desired rematch of his only career loss, a devastating one-punch knockout in October 2017.

“I definitely made a statement,” said Lubin, who is trained by Kevin Cunningham. “I beat one of the top guys in the division, and that’s always a statement. I feel like I beat one of the top 154 pounders and I’m going to keep doing that. I’m going to stay in the gym and keep getting better. I know I hurt him in the last round. I was trying to get him out of there, but still be cautious. He was game. He’s an Olympian with good experience, so I didn’t want to get too wild.

“I think Jermell Charlo is going to come out on top against Jeison Rosario. I’m ready for a rematch if he can take care of business like I did. I changed up a lot since the first fight. I have a master trainer in my corner in Kevin Cunningham, along with my longtime trainer Jason Galarza. I’m just all around a better fighter since the first time we fought.”

In the co-main event, a 12-round WBC Featherweight Title Eliminator, Mongolian Olympic silver-medalist Tugstsogt Nyambayar (12-1, 9 KOs) rode two early knockdowns to win a highly competitive split-decision over Barbadian Cobia Breedy (15-1, 5 KOs), setting up a possible rematch with WBC Featherweight World Champion Gary Russell Jr. The judges scored the fight (114-113, 114-112, 111-115).

Nyambayar dropped Breedy twice in the opening two rounds, once with his right hand and once with his left, but the gutsy Breedy climbed his way back into the fight after the early setbacks. Breedy was the busier fighter, throwing 62 punches per round compared to 47 for Nyambayar. “King Tug” landed the harder punches and connected on 51 percent of his power punches in the fight.

“It was a tough fight,” said the 28-year-old Nyambayar. “I have a lot of respect for Breedy. He’s a great boxer. I thought I won the fight and did well to get the knock downs early. I thought I got the job done and I’m ready for the next step. I knew it was a close fight, but I wasn’t thinking about the score. I was surprised it was a split decision, but I thought I did enough to get the win.”

In the opening bout of the telecast, Philadelphia’s welterweight phenom Jaron Ennis (26-0, 24 KOs) continued his rapid ascent up the 147-pound charts by recording his 16th straight KO, this time against durable veteran Juan Carlos Abreu (23-6-1, 21 KOs), who had never been stopped before in his career.

“I was in there having my fun, then my dad said to stop playing with him, and that it’s time to take him out, so that’s what I did,” said Ennis, who goes by the nickname “Boots”. “I know he’s fought some tough guys in the past. Compare what I did to what they did. It shows the different skill level and attributes that I have. I made a statement tonight and stopped someone who’s never been stopped. Bring on the top 10 and top five guys or title eliminators. I’m coming for the championship next year.”

The switch-hitting Ennis landed his first meaningful punch in the fifth round, sending Abreu to the canvas with a vicious right-handed uppercut. Abreu beat the referee’s count and survived the round, but the end was imminent. In the next round, the 23-year-old Ennis knocked Abreu down for the sixth and seventh times of his career, forcing referee John Callas to stop the bout at 1:06 of round six. Ennis, who was pushed into the sixth round for just the third time of his career, now has 16 knockdowns in his last seven bouts. (Watch the first knockdown HERE)

Welterweight contender Jaron Ennis expects to be a champion in 2019(VIDEO)

Philly’s Jaron Ennis is a guy that many are talking about at 147. He has talent, he has a fan-friendly style, and right now he is slowly building a name for himself.

Recently at 2300 Arena in Philly, Ennis knocked out Raymond Serrano in two. With the victory, Ennis moved to 22-0, including 20 by knockout. The 21-year-old Ennis has now stopped 12 consecutive fighters.

“I feel like I can do it all,” Ennis said. “I know I can do it all. I can box right-handed, southpaw, strong, fast, slick; I can do it all.”

Ennis wants to keep moving up the ranks, and he believes that he will have a shot at a title near the end of 2019.

After defeating Serrano, we caught up with Ennis, who discussed his plans for the future, and how stacks up against the best at 147.

Take a listen:

Ennis-Serrano set for November 16 in Philly

Highly touted unbeaten welterweight prospect Jaron Ennis will square off against 11-year professional Raymond Serrano in a Philadelphia vs. Philadelphia 10-round bout in the main event of ShoBox: The New Generation, Friday, November 16 live on SHOWTIME® at 9:35 p.m. ET/PT from 2300 Arena in Philadelphia.
Ennis (21-0, 19 KOs) has knocked out 11 consecutive opponents including a third-round stoppage of Armando Alvarez in his ShoBox debut in July (Click HERE for video). The 21-year-old Ennis, who compiled an amateur record of 58-3 and was the 2015 National Golden Gloves Champion before turning professional in 2016, faces a stern test in fellow Philadelphia native Raymond Serrano (24-5, 10 KOs), a 29-fight veteran who’s five losses have come against opponents with a combined record of 89-1-1 at the time of their meeting.
The three-fight telecast features five ShoBox veterans and three fighters who call Philadelphia home. In the co-feature, a pair of ShoBox veterans meet when Chicago’s Kenneth Sims Jr. (13-1-1, 4 KOs) takes on Philadelphia’s Samuel Teah (14-2-1, 7 KOs) in an eight-round super lightweight bout.
Also on the card, undefeated Ukrainian Arnold Khegai (13-0-1, 9 KOs) faces New Jersey’s Jorge Diaz (19-5-1, 10 KOs) in an eight-round super bantamweight bout.
Tickets for the show, which is promoted by Victory Promotions in association with Hard Hitting Promotions are priced $50, $75 and $125 and can be purchased at2300arena.com and hardhittingpromotions.com.
Ennis returns to ShoBox for his second consecutive fight following a statement third-round knockout of then-unbeaten welterweight prospect Armando Alvarez in July. Making a name for himself in Philadelphia with his power and come-forward mentality,Ennis has scored 11consecutive KO victories including two at 2300 Arena. A standout amateur who was ranked No. 1 at 141 pounds and won the 2015 National Golden Gloves tournament, Ennis narrowly missed the opportunity to represent the U.S. in the 2016 Olympics after losing a box-off to Gary Antuanne Russell at the Olympic Trials.
“Serrano is just another opponent on my way to my ultimate goal – a world championship,” said Ennis. “I am focused and I’m just going to keep working hard until I am able to accomplish that main goal. I can’t wait to display my talent once again onShoBox.
The 21-year-old Ennis currently trains under his father Derek “Bozy” Ennis Sr., who also trained his other sons Derek Jr. and Farah, both ShoBox veterans.
The 29-year-old Serrano turned professional in 2007 and rattled off 18 consecutive wins to start his career. Serrano, who will appear on ShoBox for the first time since his 2013 meeting with Emmanuel Taylor, will face his third consecutive unbeaten opponent after a No Contest against Gerome Quigley Jr. and a unanimous decision loss to 22-year-old welterweight prospect Malik Hawkins. Serrano, also from Philadelphia, had an impressive amateur career, winning the national and international Junior Olympic tournaments in 2005 and the Pennsylvania State Golden Gloves in 2006.
“I am excited – this is Philly vs. Philly,” said Serrano. “We are two of the best welterweights going at it. I believe my experience with my new trainer Shadeed Saluki will help me in this fight and I do not think he has been in the ring with anyone like me. I am excited to be on ShoBox because the world will see my talents. With a win, this will lead me to even bigger fights.”
Sims, a Chicago native, returns to ShoBox after his action-packed split-draw with unbeaten prospect Montana Love in July. Sims suffered the first and only loss of his career against Rolando Chinea via close majority decision on ShoBox a year prior but got back to his winning ways with a unanimous decision over Andrew Rodgers on October 13. The 24-year-old, who has sparred with Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao, was a 2013 U.S. National Amateur Champion and a 2012 Olympic Trials semifinalist.
“I am ready to fight,” said Sims. “I just fought on October 13 and got right back in the gym, so I am already in good shape. Teah is a good fighter but he is nothing special and certainly nothing that I haven’t seen before. I am happy to be back on ShoBox. I know they liked my last fight because it showed that I am only getting better and better every fight.”
Teah, born in Liberia and fighting out of Philadelphia, has had mixed luck on ShoBox.A two-fight veteran of the developmental series, Teah scored a unanimous decision over previously undefeated O’Shaquie Foster in 2015 but dropped a majority decision to Montana Love in February, an opponent who Sims Jr. drew with. Teah, who did not start boxing until the age of 19, scored an impressive first-round knockout of Zach Ramsey his last time out in August at 2300 Arena.
“I will be ready to fight come November 16,” said Teah. “I have seen Kenneth Sims fight. He is fast and was a good amateur. He just fought a draw against the last fighter who beat me, Montana Love. I am excited about fighting him and I am also excited to be on ShoBox. I always face a higher level of opposition when I am on and ShoBox is always a great showcase.”
The aggressive, come-forward Khegai made his U.S. debut at the 2300 Arena onShoBox in May, registering the most impressive result of his career with a unanimous decision over Adam Lopez. The undefeated Khegai, who is a former Ukraine national amateur champion and two-time world champion in Thai boxing, made the switch to professional boxing in 2015 and has since compiled a near-perfect record while competing mostly in Russia.  Born to Korean parents in Lymanske, Ukraine, the all-action Khegai will make his second ShoBox appearance in search of another statement win.
“I am excited to be fighting in the U.S. on SHOWTIME,” said Khegai. “I look forward to putting on a memorable performance and cementing myself as a top name in the division. November 16 can’t come soon enough!”
Jorge Diaz Jr., from New Brunswick, New Jersey, is coming off a significant victory over then once-beaten Adam Lopez, an opponent Khegai also beat via decision. The 31-year-old Diaz, who last fought in November 2017, also boasts impressive victories over Olympic gold-medalist Yan Barthelemy and former title challengers Alejandro Lopez and Emmanuel Lucero. Diaz’s five professional losses have come against opponents that hold a combined record of 88-1-4.
“I feel very confident,” said Diaz. “My opponent is a good fighter, who is strong, aggressive, and throws sharp punches but I will be in tip-top shape. This is a very important fight for me. I have this great opportunity, so I will be dedicated and will give my best effort.”
Hall of Famer Barry Tompkins will call the ShoBox action from ringside with fellow Hall of Famer Steve Farhood and former world champion Raul Marquez serving as expert analysts. The executive producer is Gordon Hall with Chuck McKean producing and Rick Phillips directing.