Smith Jr.: ‘I want the big fights out there’

Joe Smith Jr., the common man with the common name, finally reached boxing’s apex. Smith used a furious late rally to edge Maxim Vlasov by majority decision and win the vacant WBO light heavyweight world title Saturday evening at Osage Casino in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The scorecards — 114-114, 115-113 and 115-112 — represented the nip-and-tuck nature of the bout.

Smith (27-3, 21 KOs), from Long Island, New York, swept the last two rounds on the cards to pull out the victory and joins promotional stablemate Jamel Herring as a Long Island-born world champion. He now sets his sights on the division’s other champions, including WBC/IBF king Artur Beterbiev. 

Vlasov (45-4, 26 KOs), from Samara Russia, saw his three-bout winning streak come to an end.

Smith said, “It’s a great feeling. It was definitely a close, tough fight. I give it to Vlasov. Great fighter. He really put on a great show tonight and toughed it out. I believe that round where I hurt him there… I believe he had his head down, and I should’ve got the knockout. I think I would’ve got the stoppage in {the 11th} round, but he pulled it off and made it out on his feet. I believe I got the victory tonight because they saw I landed the harder shots. He landed a lot of punches. It was a great fight.
 
“I want the other belts. I want the big fights out there. Now I gotta get back in the gym and keep working on my technique and stuff. I believe I’m going to start unifying belts.”

Vlasov disagrees with Smith’s assessment of the fight and believes the world title should be going home to Russia.

“This was a very hard-fought, competitive fight,” Vlasov said. “I thought I was winning rounds and was well ahead. Against the aggressive style of Joe Smith, I came forward the entire fight. I felt confident I was winning and was securing rounds in the bank with the judges. I never felt that I was behind at any stage of the fight. This was my opportunity to show the world I was a world champion, and I did that, and Joe Smith knows I did that.” 

Ajagba Obliterates Howard

Efe Ajagba (15-0, 12 KOs) just crashed the heavyweight contender parade. The 2016 Nigerian Olympian sent Brian Howard into another orbit with a crunching right hand. Howard twisted, fell face first, and the bout was immediately stopped. Ajagba had not fought since last September’s decision win over Jonathan Rice, but he re-established his place among the world’s top young heavyweights. At 26 years old, time is on his side.

Ajagba said, “I felt good. I tried to pick the punches, use the jab. This guy is very slick sometimes. I tried to do the job. He was shaky, so when I went back to the corner after the first round, my coach told me to take my time, start with the body, leave the head.
 
“I trained for this fight, took my time, started with my boxing foundation, and came back strong. This camp was the best one for me, the best camp ever in my boxing career.
 
 “It’s my time to shine, so I’m coming for the heavyweights.”

In undercard bouts:

Heavyweight: 
Jared Anderson (9-0, 9 KOs) KO 2 Jeremiah Karpency (16-3-1, 6 KOs), :34. Anderson, the 21-year-old prodigy from Toledo, added another speedy knockout to his highlight reel, this time using a body attack to end things early. He knocked down Karpency with a body blow at the end of the first round, then ended things with another right hand to the body early in the second round. 

Anderson said,  “I knew he was going to find a spot to fall. I respect him for getting in there and showing up today. It’s a man’s sport. I’m just grateful to be here, thankful for the opportunity.

“I {saw} the shot. His hands kept going up. I kept throwing my jab, looking for openings, feinting, moving around the ring, and it just came. It was a good shot, and he didn’t want to get back up.
 
“Everybody who says they’re the biggest and the baddest, come see ‘Big ‘Baby’ then.
 
“I want to thank Toledo, my city. A lot of them came out to Oklahoma, and I wanted to put on a show for them. I can’t wait for what is next.

Junior Lightweight: Albert Bell (18-0, 5 KOs) UD 8 Manuel Rey Rojas (20-5, 6 KOs). Scores: 78-74 3x. Toledo’s Bell used his length and reach to keep the shorter Rojas at bay and ultimately cruised to a one-sided decision. Bell, who outlanded Rojas 114-94, is ranked in the top 15 by two of the major sanctioning organizations.

Junior Lightweight: Robson Conceicao (16-0, 8 KOs) TKO 7 Jesus Antonio Ahumada (17-4 11 KOs), 1:20. 2016 Olympic gold medalist Conceicao, from Bahia, Brazil, put forth a workmanlike performance and beat down Mexican veteran Ahumada. After a knockdown in the seventh, referee Gary Ritter saw enough and saved Ahumada from further carnage. 

Heavyweight: Trey Lippe Morrison (17-0, 17 KOs) TKO 3 Jason Bergman (2-3, 2 KOs), 1:27. Lippe Morrison, son of the late heavyweight Tommy Morrison, returned from a nearly two-year layoff and stopped veteran Bergman in a crowd-pleasing slugfest. Bergman appeared to knock down Morrison in the first, but the referee missed the knockdown call. In the third, Bergman rolled his ankle and could continue, and Morrison was awarded the TKO victory.

Featherweight: Duke Ragan (4-0, 1 KO) UD 6  Charles Clark (3-7,-1 1 KO). Scores: 60-54 3x. In his first fight away from the confines of the MGM Grand Las Vegas Bubble, Cincinnati’s Ragan outboxed Clark and won every round on all three judges’ scorecards. Through four pro bouts, Ragan has yet to lose a round.

Heavyweight: Jeremiah Milton (3-0, 3 KOs) TKO 1 Jayvone Dafney (2-3, 2 KOs), 1:19. Tulsa native Milton had a successful homecoming, icing Dafney in the opening round with a right hand as Daffney was backed up against the ropes. A dazed Dafney could not respond, and the referee called the bout off.

Heavyweight: Sonny Conto (7-0, 6 KOs) KO 1 Waldo Cortes (6-4, 3 KO), 1:41. Welcome back, Sonny! In his first fight in 15 months, South Philadelphia native Conto put Cortes down for the 10-count with a sweeping right hand. Conto has now won three straight by first-round stoppage.

Photo Credit: Mikey Williams/Top Rank via Getty Images

Ennis on win over Lipinets: ‘I think I graduated’

Jaron “Boots” Ennis (27-0, 25 KOs) finally got his big test on Saturday night, and he passed it with flying colors. Ennis scored a sixth-round knockout win over former world champion Sergey Lipinets (16-2-1, 12 KOs) in the main event from Mohegan Sun Arena in Uncasville, Conn.(Showtime)

Before the stoppage, Ennis was in complete control and dropped Lipinets in the fourth round. It was Lipinets’ second time being knocked down in his career. As he has done often throughout his career, the 23-year-old switched effortlessly between an orthodox and southpaw stance and exhibited tremendous power from both sides. 

“I’ll always be hard on myself when I look back at my performance,” said Ennis. “My goal is to keep getting better, sharper, faster, and stronger so I can become world champion. As long as I keep fighting top guys, I’m happy. I feel like I will be world champion by the end of this year or beginning of next year. Patience is the key, though.”

In the sixth round, Ennis poured it on Lipinets from all angles as he beautifully assembled combinations. He has yet to go past the sixth round in his professional career and registered in 17th consecutive stoppage victory.

“I think I graduated tonight,” stated Ennis. “It’s on the up and up now. It’s onto bigger and better fights now.”

Ennis is a dangerous fighter, and because of that, he will have a difficult time getting the top guys at 147 in the ring. At this point, Ennis is high risk, low reward, so he’s going to have to keep beating guys until he becomes a mandatory challenger for one of the belts, so while some believe he’s ready for a title shot now, don’t be surprised if it does not happen in 2021.

Photo: Amanda Westcott/SHOWTIME

Ennis on fight with Lipinets: ‘It will be the start of me being a pay-per-view star’

Undefeated rising welterweight star Jaron “Boots” Ennis(26-0, 24 KOs) has been the talk of the boxing world. Ennis clearly has a lot of talent and a lot of ability, which will be tested on Saturday night when he faces former world champion Sergey Lipinets(16-1, 12 KOs) in a 12-round welterweight clash at the Mohegan Sun Arena in Uncasville, Conn.(Showtime)

Despite Lipinets being a former world champion, the 23-year-old Ennis, who has a 16-fight knockout streak, is not concerned.

“I’m not worried about what Lipinets is talking about,” he said. “At the end of the day, he still has to get in the ring with me on Saturday night. And we’re going to see. They don’t know what I’m going to bring. I’m an all-around fighter. You don’t know how I’m going to fight. I can fight several different ways. He just needs to know he’s gotta be ready.”

According to Ennis, Lipinets is the type of opponent he’s been waiting to fight for a long time. 

“I’ve been trying to get these types of guys in the ring for about two-and-a-half years,” he said. “I’ve been trying to get former world champions and top ten guys. It just didn’t happen. I finally got my chance, and you guys are going to see a whole different animal. A whole different beast. It’s time for me to do my thing. I’m real excited.”

If he gets by Lipinets, which he believes he will, Ennis wants the big boys at 147 pounds.

“After I do my thing on Saturday night and I do it with a big statement, it’s only up from there,” he said. “On to bigger and better things. The elite fighters and the top three guys and then maybe a world title by the end of the year. This fight is just going to elevate my ranking, my superstardom, and it will be the start of me being a pay-per-view star.

Look, Ennis appears to have the goods, and if he looks spectacular on Saturday night, he might have a difficult time getting the big names in the ring, but he can worry about that later. Lipinets should test him, and we’ll see if Ennis can ace it.

Perrella expects to be a different fighter with Roy Jones Jr. in his corner

Hard-hitting southpaw Bryant “Goodfella” Perrella detailed his current training camp, including what he’s learned from his new trainer, all-time great Roy Jones Jr., and previewed his upcoming showdown against former world champion Tony “Superbad” Harrison before they square off in the FOX PBC Fight Night main event and on FOX Deportes Saturday, April 17 from Shrine Auditorium and Expo Hall in Los Angeles.

“After my last fight I went on a bit of a sparring tour,” said Perrella, detailing the origins of how he linked up with his new trainer. “I ended up sparring with some of Roy’s guys in Pensacola, and afterward he let me stay to soak up some more knowledge. The rest is history. It was an easy decision to stay out there and grow under one of the best fighters ever. It’s like going off to a university. Every day I come in with my notepad and pen ready.”

Perrella will return to the ring after suffering a disappointing defeat in his last fight in February 2020 on FOX. Perrella led on all three scorecards heading into the final round against Abel Ramos, but was stopped in the waning moments of the round. For Perrella, he’s learned from the experience, and combined with his new trainer, believes it will all end up helping him long term.

“Everything that happened with the Ramos fight has been addressed and changed,” said Perrella. “That lost sent me on the journey that led me to this new weight class and training with Roy. Everything happens for a reason, as long as you look for that reason and have faith in it. That reason has been shown to me in so many ways and it’s a huge blessing.”

After spending a majority his career fighting at 147 pounds, Perrella will fight at the super welterweight limit for the first time since his third pro fight. For the six-foot, one-inch Perrella, he believes that moving up in weight full-time will open up different aspects of his game.

“The decision to move up in weight was because of how I felt in the Ramos fight,” said Perrella. “Making 147 pounds was taking a lot out of me. I performed well, but I know how I felt in that ring. I have so much more to give as a fighter. That was really only 30% of me. Making weight was coming at a cost and I no longer thought it was helping me.

“I know these fighters at 154 are bigger and stronger, but so am I. I’m going to be stronger than ever and I’m going to be ready to tangle. I probably should have been at this weight for a while. I was always a fighter moving down in weight. I still train hard like always, but by not having to worry as much about weight, I’m able to add big layers to my game. With all these changes, I even surprise myself some days with what I can do now. I’m super confident and I can’t wait to bring it all to the ring on fight night.”

Perrella not only finds motivation from returning in a primetime main event, but from having elite opposition in the former 154-pound champion Harrison. Perrella knows that Harrison presents a versatile and difficult task, but is more than up to the challenge in front of him.

“This is a huge opportunity to fight one of the top guys at this weight,” said Perrella. “I wouldn’t have it any other way. It definitely helps motivate me to have this kind of chance on this stage against a fighter like Tony.

“Tony has different layers and dimensions to his game. He can box with his jab and length, but he can also come forward with that high guard. At this level, it’s a game of adjustments. This is going to be an interesting clash of styles. There’s no other southpaw like me. He’s sharp and has experience, but I’m a whole different kind of animal than anything he’s seen.”

With Roy Jones Jr. in his corner, Perrella believes that he has the confidence to not only come out victorious on April 17, but to make this a memorable action fight for fans watching.

“I have a unique approach and now I have Roy passing down his knowledge from his experiences,” said Perrella. “It’s like a shortcut. I’m getting the knowledge handed right to me instead of going through it not knowing what to expect. This matchup is between two strong fighters and the fans can expect an action packed fight from start to finish.”

Herring: ‘They called me every name in the book, but even with the cut, I wasn’t going to give up’

In the biggest fight of his career, Jamel Herring came up big and dominated and then stopped Carl Frampton in the sixth round to retain his WBO junior lightweight world title Saturday from Caesars Bluewaters Dubai.

The 35-year-old Herring (23-2, 11 KOs) dropped Frampton twice in the fight, the second one coming in the sixth round courtesy of a brutal uppercut. A follow-up assault prompted Frampton’s corner to throw in the towel, and with that, Herring gets his signature victory and his first stoppage win since May 2018.

“It was an emotional rollercoaster just to get here,” Herring said. “My last outing was not my best. People doubted me. They called me every name in the book, but even with the cut, I wasn’t going to give up. I wasn’t going to quit, and Carl Frampton is a tremendous champion. I’ve been a fan since day one. It’s tough to see any veteran of the sport go out like that.”

Frampton (28-3, 16 KOs), from Belfast, was attempting to become the first man from the island of Ireland to win world titles in three weight classes. Having fallen short of that goal, the 34-year-old elected to retire.

“I said before the fight I’d retire if I lost, and that’s exactly what I’m going to do,” Frampton said. “I want to just to dedicate my life to my family now. Boxing has been good to me. It’s also been bad to me, but the last few years with these boys have been the best years of my career. I just want to go home to my beautiful wife and kids, and that’s it.

“I just got beat by the better man. I really struggled to get inside on him.”

Will Frampton retire? Who knows. Boxers emotionally retire after fights all the time, so we’ll see what happens next. Regarding Herring, does he unify with WBC 130-pound champion Oscar Valdez, or will he battle WBO number one contender Shakur Stevenson? It should be interesting, but if you’re Herring, you want to unify, so Valdez, who is signed to Top Rank like Herring, and someone he called out after the fight, seems to be the obvious choice. 

Courtesy: D4G Promotions

Jones Jr.’s trainer:  De La Hoya should fight Jones Jr. in July

Former world champion Roy Jones Jr. (66-9, 47 KOs) has let it be known that he is willing to battle Oscar De La Hoya (39-6, 30 KOs) in his return to the ring this summer on Triller.

The 48-year-old De La Hoya announced last week that he will return to the ring in July. No word if it’s a real fight or an exhibition.

“I spoke to Roy today, and he is feeling great and is willing to fight Oscar De La Hoya,” said Alfy Smith, Roy Jones Jr.’s trainer. “I know that they never got to fight based off weight classes before, but now would be the perfect time to give the fans a great fight that they’d thought they would get to see. De La Hoya has one of the greatest left hooks in boxing history; Roy has a devastating hook as well; we shall see who will be the real “Captain Hook.”

The 52-year-old Jones Jr. returned on November 28th against Mike Tyson in an exhibition bout, which did well on pay-per-view. The fight ended in a draw. Now, Jones Jr. wants another legend.

“The fans all over the world love Roy Jones Jr and Oscar De La Hoya,” continued Smith. “This is a great fight, an exciting matchup where you would only dream it up in a video game, now we have a chance to make it a reality. Roy is still active and training every day, he’s in tremendous shape, and his speed is still crisp.”

The weight difference would make this fight hard to put together, but I guess anything is possible.

Ennis: ‘I don’t think I have my man strength yet’

Undefeated welterweight Jaron “Boots” Ennis will look to cement his status as a rising star in the welterweight division when he takes on rugged former world champion Sergey Lipinets in a 12-round battle that headlines action live on SHOWTIME Saturday, April 10 from Mohegan Sun Arena in Uncasville, Conn. in a Premier Boxing Champions event.

The 23-year-old Ennis will be facing the toughest competition of his career in Lipinets, as he enters the ring in his first SHOWTIME CHAMPIONSHIP BOXING main event. Representing the fighting city of Philadelphia, Ennis has used sublime boxing skills and power in both hands to make his claim as the city’s next great champion.

Ennis put together a 16-fight knockout streak that included becoming the first person to stop Juan Carlos Abreu when he blasted out the longtime challenger in the sixth round in August 2020. Ennis was unable to extend that streak in December 2020, when his fight against Chris van Heerden was declared a no-contest after round one due to a clash of heads causing a severe cut on Van Heerden’s forehead.

Trained by his father Bozy Ennis, Ennis shared his thoughts on training camp, Lipinets and more below:

On headlining his first Showtime Championship Boxing card: 

“It has made my schedule a little crazier. Being in the main event on SHOWTIME brings more attention, but I like it. I like being in the spotlight. I like to shine, so it’s nothing new to me. Now it’s fight time. I am locked in and ready to rock and roll.”

On training camp:

“We always do four-minute rounds in camp. I’ve been doing that since I was a baby. That’s another reason why I don’t sit down when I fight, because I am so used to the four-minute rounds. The three-minute rounds go by real fast on fight night. One thing we added this camp was the underwater treadmill work.”

On his final preparations: 

“The week before the fight, we are winding it down and sharpening up. It’s been a great training camp. I have been getting better and better each and every day, and I can’t wait to perform next Saturday.”

On facing his first former world champion: 

“He’s a good fighter, but it doesn’t mean anything to me. It’s just another day in the office. He’s a regular person just like anyone else.”

On Sergey calling him a ‘typical Philly fighter’:

“I guess he knows I’m tough, gritty and I’m ready to rumble. I’m coming there to take a win home to Philadelphia and look good doing it, by any means.”

On his knockout power:

“I don’t think I have my man strength yet. I feel it will be one or two more years until I fully have my man strength. The crazy part is, I feel like in a fight, I still haven’t thrown a real power shot and really sat down on a punch yet. Everything I’ve been knocking guys out with has been all natural strength.”

On how he views his knockout streak:

“Some people might look at a knockout on April 10 as the 17th consecutive knockout, some might view it as the start of a new knockout streak. For me, I don’t really care as long as I come out victorious. That’s all that matters to me. I’m not looking for a knockout but I’m going to take it if it comes.”

Photo: Amanda Westcott/SHOWTIME

Devin Haney on Linares: ‘Best fighter I will have ever faced in my career’

Devin ‘The Dream’ Haney will defend his WBC World Lightweight title against Jorge Linares at the Michelob ULTRA Arena at Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas Saturday, May 29. The event will air live worldwide on DAZN in association with Devin Haney Promotions and Golden Boy Promotions.

The spotlight will be on Haney (25-0, 18 KOs) over Memorial Day Weekend as he puts his belt on the line for the third time, this time taking on Linares who will provide the sternest test of the champion’s rich talents. The 22-year-old star will box in his Las Vegas backyard for just the third time in his career and first time since his sixth pro outing in May 2016.

‘The Dream’ was elevated to World champion after a destructive KO win over Zaur Abdullaev in New York in September 2019. He went on to defend his belt twice with comfortable distance wins over Alfredo Santiago in November 2019 and Yuriorkis Gamboa the following November.

“I’m very excited to be making my third World title defense against a great fighter like Jorge Linares, who will be the best fighter I will have ever faced in my career,” said Haney. “He’s a three-division World champion who has fought at the championship level for the past thirteen years.

“I grew up watching Linares and the fact that this fight is happening in Las Vegas is incredible. Boxing fans around the world are eager to see me step up in competition which is great, and I know Linares is coming to fight. I’m ready to give the fans a spectacular performance. The better competition brings the best out of me. Against Linares, I’m going to show the world why I’m the king of the Lightweight division.”

Linares (47-5, 29 KOs) is looking to become a two-time holder of the WBC strap that he won in December 2014 against Javier Prieto. The fight was a catalyst to a four-year run where the Venezuelan ace beat Kevin Mitchell, Ivan Cano, Anthony Crolla twice, Luke Campbell and Mercito Gesta as Lightweight king before he faced defeat in a to-and-fro clash with Vasiliy Lomachenko in New York in May 2018.

The 35-year-old takes on Haney in his 15th World title battle and 53rd bout in over 18 years as a pro. Linares believes there are plenty more chapters to be written in his storied career.

Linares said, “This is my moment to show the world that I still have a lot more to give at 135 pounds. Devin Haney is a talented and quick-handed young man, but when I was his age, I had already become a world champion by snatching the title away from a real World champion like Oscar Larios. And now you can imagine how much more experience I have now at an age where I feel stronger and better than ever.”

“Without a doubt it will be a tremendous fight, but I will demonstrate that Haney made a big mistake by accepting a challenge that he is still not ready to overcome.”

Promoter Eddie Hearn said, “This is the breakout fight that will show the world that Devin Haney is the best lightweight on the planet. Jorge Linares is a tremendous fighter, a three-weight king that has speed, power and plenty of experience.”

“I’ve represented four fighters who have attempted to beat Jorge and failed, but this time I believe we have the future king of the division in Devin, and this is his moment. May 29, the bright lights of Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, this is the moment.”

Chavez Jr.: ‘I will be ready to face anyone in the Light Heavyweight division starting with Silva’

The Legend Anderson Silva has agreed to fight Julio Chavez Jr. in “Tribute to the Kings” in a boxing match on Saturday, June 19th, which will be on Pay Per View in North America.

Anderson Silva, considered by many to be the greatest MMA fighter of all time, will take on former WBC Middleweight Champion of the world Julio Cesar Chavez, Jr. in a boxing match on June 19th at Jalisco Stadium in Guadalajara, Mexico. Silva of Curitiba Brazil was the longest reigning middleweight Champion for the UFC and compiled a record of 34 victories with 11 losses and 23 stunning knockouts. His boxing record is 13 – 1. Chavez, Jr. has a record of 52-5-1 with 34 knockouts.

“When I look back at my journey, I see that nothing has been in vain! 

“I am extremely happy for the opportunity to test my boxing skills with Julio César Chávez Jr. I train continuously, always am striving for resilience and to overcome obstacles. Fighting is my everlasting breath,” said Silva.

“I have rededicated myself to the sport I love and I will be ready to face anyone in the Light Heavyweight division starting with Silva. I will be prepared to be victorious on June 19th,” said Julio Cesar Chavez Jr.

This Massive Event, “Tribute to The Kings,” will be live on Pay-Per-View and will also feature a special Exhibition bout that will see Julio Cesar Chavez Sr. make his final ring appearance against Hector Camacho Jr. Camacho will be honoring the legacy of his late Hall of Fame father.

Whyte: ‘Anybody on the planet that gets hit with that left hook, they’re going down’

Dillian Whyte(28-2, 19 KOs) flattened Alexander Povetkin(36-3-1) with a huge left hook to drop and earn a fourth-round TKO in their rematch at the Europa Point Sports Complex in Gibraltar on Saturday.

The rematch was originally scheduled to take place in November, but Povetkin tested positive for COVID-19.

The 32-year-old Whyte had Povetkin on the brink of a knockout throughout their second heavyweight battle and closed the show dramatically, returning the favor after he lost to the Russian last year.

“I was so close, and then one lapse in concentration, and I made a mistake,” Whyte said. “Tonight, I was like ‘yo’, I’m looking to beat some a** tonight. I was trying to get it done in the first round, but then I had to relax. Anybody on the planet that gets hit with that left hook they’re going down. Some of them might get up, but most will stay down. He was kind of badly hurt. Now I feel bad. I want him to go home to his family healthy. 

“One loss, two-loss so what. It was a good learning fight for me because I had to think in there. I was rushing him, but I had to think also. He’s still very heavy-handed, and he’s still very good. I’m going to spend some time with my family and just relax. I’ll probably call Eddie tomorrow and ask him what we’re doing next. I want to make the most of it now and retire good and healthy.”

Whyte’s promoter Eddie Hearn would like to see him fight former WBC heavyweight champion, Deontay Wilder.

“For me, we called for the Deontay Wilder fight for a long, long time,” Hearn said. “He actually DMed and said I’ll never give you that fight. Now he’s calling for that fight. To me, that’s a stadium fight. I’d like to get him back out again quickly in the summer. But the goal has always been to get Dillian Whyte a world title.”

It should be interesting to see what’s next for Whyte, who regained the WBC interim title with the victory over the 41-year-old Povetkin. A fight with Wilder would be fun. He’s also in line to face WBC heavyweight champion Tyson Fury, but he’ll be fighting unified champion Anthony Joshua next, so who knows what will happen with Whyte, but he’s sure happy to get his hand raised once again. 

Photo: Mark Robinson/Dave Thompson/Matchroom Boxing