Photos: KSI defeats Logan Paul

There was a big buildup and decent scrap, and in the end, KSI was able to defeat Logan Paul by split decision in front of announced crowd of 12,137 at Staples Center in Los Angeles on Saturday night.

The difference in the rematch was when Paul was given a two-point deduction by referee Jack Reiss after hitting KSI while he was down in Round 4. One judge scored the fight 56-55 for Paul, which was overruled by the other two judges, who had it 57-54 and 56-55 for KSI.

The YouTube rivals clashed in August 2018 at the sold-out Manchester Arena in Manchester, England and was watched by over 1 million live pay-per-view buyers on YouTube, with the fight ending in a majority draw with KSI edging the battle on one card with two judges unable to split them.

Here are photos from KSI-PAUL 2:

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Photos: Ed Mulholland/Matchroom Boxing USA
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Herring on Berchelt: ‘In order to be the best, you have to keep testing yourself’

Jamel “Semper Fi” Herring, a U.S. Marine Corps veteran, retained his WBO junior lightweight world title with a Veterans Day Weekend unanimous decision (115-113 and 117-111 2X) win over top contender Lamont Roach Jr. in front of 7,412 fans at Chukchansi Park.

Herring controlled the action early, but Roach landed a hellacious right hand at the end of the 11th that nearly sent Herring through the ropes. Roach pressed the action in the 12th, but it was too little, too late, as “The Fighting Marine” made his first successful title defense.

“I won {the title} on Memorial Day Weekend and I defended it on Veterans Day Weekend, so it definitely means a lot to all of our troops out there defending our country and still in harm’s way,” Herring said. “This is for ya’ll. I couldn’t lose it on our weekend. It means a lot to still be a world champion.

“Like I said, Miguel Berchelt is considered number one, the best super featherweight in the world. In order to be the best, you have to keep testing yourself.”

Said Roach: “We knew we had to dig down. When I hurt him, all that was on my mind was finishing him. I’m coming into unchartered territory.”

Photo: Top Rank Boxing/Mikey Williams

Chavez Jr. on fight with Jacobs: ‘I ask my fans to believe in me; I will deliver’

Daniel Jacobs and Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. will clash in a Super-Middleweight showdown at the Talking Stick Resort Arena in Phoenix, Arizona, on Friday, December 20, live on DAZN in the US and on Sky Sports in the UK.

Jacobs (35-3 29 KOs) makes the move up to 168 pounds following his Middleweight unification showdown with Canelo Alvarez in Las Vegas in May, putting his IBF crown on the line against the pound-for-pound Mexican king and WBC and WBA ruler who edged out Jacobs on the cards.

The two-time ruler at 160 pounds will make the first steps to becoming a two-weight World champion in Phoenix and does so against Mexican fan-favorite Chavez Jr (51-3-1 33 KOs). It’s a special night for the former WBC 160lb champion Chavez Jr. as he takes on the ‘Miracle Man’ at the same venue his legendary father closed the curtain on his incredible career in 2005.

The 33-year-old Chavez Jr. returned to action in August with a first-round KO win in his 56th pro outing following his own clash with Canelo back in May 2017, and like Jacobs, he sees the Phoenix clash as the first step in adding World titles at 168lbs to his Middleweight crown.

“I am thrilled to be making my debut at Super-Middleweight on December 20 against Julio Cesar Chavez,” said Jacobs. “I’ve achieved a dream of becoming a World champion at Middleweight, and now I am seeking to secure my legacy by becoming a two-weight World champion.

“There are some great fighters and champions at 168 pounds, and I believe that I will be a different beast up at Super-Middleweight. Facing Julio is a great test for my first fight, he’s a former Middleweight champion like me and he has the same goal as I do – Julio is always in great fight, and I am sure that our styles will gel to be a thriller for the fans, and I plan to announce my arrival at 168 pounds in style.”

“Going against Daniel Jacobs is the perfect fight for me because there is so much on the line,” said Chavez Jr. “A victory gets me one step closer to a world championship, and I’m not going to let anyone stand in my way.

“I know that Danny Jacobs is a former world champion and is a strong fighter with very good boxing skills. Those are the kind of boxers that bring out the best in me. I’ve been working hard in the gym and can’t wait to let everyone see what I’ve been working on. I’m very motivated to get the win, and at the end of the night, I will have my hand raised in victory. I ask my fans to believe in me; I will deliver.”

“I’m delighted to announce this huge fight will close out an incredible 2019 for Matchroom Boxing USA and DAZN,” said promoter Eddie Hearn. “Daniel returns from his point defeat to Canelo to move up in weight on his quest to become a two-weight World champion. He faces a determined Julio Cesar Chavez Jr., who looks for redemption at the site of his father’s last ever professional fight. We expect a great fight, a huge crowd, and a stacked card as we’ll look to close out the year in style.”

“As DAZN’s fight season continues, we are thrilled to bring boxing fans a huge super middleweight fight to close out the calendar year,” said Joseph Markowski, DAZN EVP, North America. “Both Daniel Jacobs and Julio Cesar Chavez, Jr. are in a position to prove themselves as title contenders on December 20, and the winner will position themselves for a career-defining fight in 2020.”

Herring on preparing for Roach: ‘It’s probably been one of the best camps that I’ve had’

Under the bright lights, above where a pitcher’s mound normally stands, Jamel “Semper Fi” Herring will enter the ring for the first time as a champion.

Herring, who makes the first defense of his WBO junior lightweight world title against Lamont Roach Jr. Saturday evening (10 p.m. ET, ESPN+) at Chukchansi Park (home of the Triple-A Fresno Grizzlies), is a U.S. Marine Corps veteran who served two tours of duty in Iraq. He won the world title on Memorial Day Weekend earlier this year and, in fitting fashion, will defend his belt on Veterans Day Weekend and the eve of the Marine Corps Birthday.

In the 10-round co-feature, IBF No. 1 heavyweight contender Kubrat Pulev (27-1, 14 KOs), seeking a 2020 world title shot, will face Detroit-based veteran Rydell Booker (26-2, 13 KOs). Pulev is angling for a shot at the winner of the Andy Ruiz Jr.-Anthony Joshua rematch, while the 38-year-old Booker is 4-1 since coming back to the ring following a 12-year prison sentence.

In other action, after the main event takes place, 19-year-old lightweight sensation Gabriel Flores Jr. (15-0, 6 KOs) will face Aelio Mesquita (19-4, 17 KOs) in an eight-rounder. Flores, from nearby Stockton, Calif., will have a rabid cheering section.

At Thursday’s final press conference, this is what the Herring and Roach had to say.

Jamel Herring:

On sparring with the likes of Terence Crawford and Maurice Hooker

“Those guys, they really helped. {Super middleweight contender} Steven Nelson being a veteran helped as well. He motivated me and pushed me… camp has been great. It’s probably been one of the best camps that I’ve had.”

On defending his title on the eve of the Marine Corps Birthday

“It’s all about what happens in the ring. All that will go in vain if I don’t play my part and perform to the best of my abilities and handle my business. It’s definitely great to be a Marine and basically be one of the only Marines on this type of platform. Of course, that’s a great feeling.”

Lamont Roach Jr.:

“It’s truly a blessing fighting on Veterans Day weekend just to honor my cousin, who was my late trainer. He was in the Army and dedicated his life to boxing. He was an All-Army champ in, I think, 1983, one of those years. Way before I was born. But he learned the game from them, and he gave the game to me. That old Army training is definitely in me. This weekend is a big weekend for all vets, but at the end of the day, it all boils down to one thing to me, and that’s inside the ring. It’s for that belt right there. Julie {Goldsticker, Herring’s publicist}, hold that belt up for me. It’s gonna go home with me, and I am going to go celebrate with the Washington Nationals and the Mystics, who won the WNBA championship.”

“I’m glad that my promotional company moved me the right way. I earned this spot. I wasn’t given this spot. All the hard work that I put in from 9 years old to now is going to show.”

“We know Jamel is a crafty fighter, but we’re gonna bring it to him. I think I can do anything in the ring better than him. I can be a better, taller fighter than him even though I’m shorter than him. I can beat him on the inside, I can beat him all around the ring. So, we’re going to see.”

Photo: Top Rank/Mikey Williams

Wilder on Ortiz: ‘When we fought the first time, I had a bad flu’

WBC heavyweight champion, Deontay “The Bronze Bomber” Wilder(41-0-1, 40 KOs), held a media workout in Alabama Tuesday night, as he prepares to battle Cuban slugger Luis “King Kong” Ortiz(31-0, 26 KOs) in a rematch that headlines a FOX Sports PBC Pay-Per-View Saturday, November 23 from the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas.

For Wilder, this is an opportunity to prove that the first fight against Ortiz was no fluke, and this time around, Wilder wants to use his jab more.

“With Ortiz, we know that he’s a smart fighter and a great counter puncher,” Wilder said. “He’s really good at what he does. I’m the only person in the top five who’s given him the opportunity.

 “I don’t think I threw enough jabs at him in the first fight. The positioning of my feet was not as good as it could be. The movement that we have is very awkward when you have an orthodox fighter against a southpaw. I’m looking forward to making it another great fight.”

After being in serious trouble in the 7th-round in their first fight, Wilder was able  to survive and stop Ortiz in the 10th-round. In that fight, according to Wilder, he was sick, and on Tuesday, Wilder explained why he did not back out of the fight.

“I’m looking to beat Ortiz in even more dramatic fashion,” Wilder said. “When we fought the first time, I had a bad flu. I could have called off the fight, but I want to be able to do things that other fighters shouldn’t or wouldn’t do.”

Credit to Wilder for fighting Ortiz the first time and fighting him again because not many were running to fight Ortiz, but Wilder is daring to be great, and beating Ortiz again would be a tremendous feat for him.

Photo: Ryan Hafey/Premier Boxing Champions

Tank Davis: ‘If you don’t belong in there with me, you won’t be in there too long’

Gervonta Davis and Badou Jack met with members of the media last Saturday in Las Vegas to discuss their upcoming matchups taking place Saturday, December 28 live on SHOWTIME at the award-winning State Farm Arena in Atlanta in a special year-end Premier Boxing Champions event.

Two-time super featherweight champion Davis will take on former unified world champion Yuriorkis Gamboa for the WBA Lightweight World Championship as the 24-year-old Davis looks to conquer another division.  In the co-main event of a special holiday SHOWTIME CHAMPIONSHIP BOXING® telecast, former two-division champion Jack will challenge WBA Light Heavyweight World Champion Jean Pascal.

Here’s what the Davis had to say:

GERVONTA DAVIS:

Thoughts about Gamboa and moving up in weight:

“We know Gamboa is a veteran and that he’s had a lot of wars, so we know we have a tough fight. He’s definitely dangerous. He can hit. He can fight.

“His last fight he made 134, so we know he can get bigger than me at that weight. I’m going into this knowing he’s a bigger fighter than me. I’m just going to bring my power and capitalize on that weight class and becoming world champion.

“I believe I’m one of the top fighters in the world, but I don’t compare myself to other fighters. I just go out and get the job done.

“Atlanta is my second home. I’m confident I’ll sell it out.”

On his ability and uniqueness as a fighter:

“I come from a different cloth than these other guys. I’ve been through everything in my life. A lot of people haven’t experienced what I have. If I ever get beat it would have to be by someone who’s been through what I have been through. It can’t be anyone who’s just been training all their life.

“Every time I step in the ring I’m willing to leave it all in there. A lot of people haven’t seen my full skills because I haven’t fought an opponent that has brought them out.”

On his potential in the sport:

“The boxing world hasn’t seen my true potential as a fighter, they’ve just seen my power. I’m the type of boxer where if you don’t belong in there with me, you won’t be in there too long. Some fighters like to take their time. I’m the type, if I know you’re not on my level, I’m going to show it. The world will see. I’ll fight anybody.”

Photo: Sean Michael Ham/Mayweather Promotions

Charlo on Harrison: ‘If it does go 12 rounds, he’s going to be very injured at the end’

The highly anticipated WBC Super Welterweight Title rematch between Tony “Superbad” Harrison and Jermell “Iron Man” Charlo will headline live in primetime in FOX PBC Fight Night Action and on FOX Deportes Saturday, December 21 from Toyota Arena in Ontario, California.

Harrison vs. Charlo II is a high-voltage rematch that has been building ever since the end of the first matchup. The two were set to meet in June, but the rematch was postponed when Harrison suffered torn ligaments after spraining his ankle in training.

Now that he is fully healed, Harrison is ready to solidify his hold on the title while Charlo is ready to take back what he believes belongs to him. The rematch comes just one day short of a full year from the first time the two stepped into ring against each other on FOX.

In the first meeting, Harrison deployed a tactical defensive strategy that blunted much of the force of Charlo’s high-powered offense. The intrigue of the rematch is whether Harrison will be able to use a similar strategy to remain champion or will Charlo be able to impose his will on Harrison and regain the title.

The 29-year-old Harrison (28-2, 21 KOs) entered the first match against Charlo having come up short in his previous world title attempt. He lost to Jarrett Hurd in a bid for the IBF title in 2017. Harrison, a protégé of the late Emanuel Steward and a native of Detroit, bounced back with three strong performances, including a decision victory over former world champion Ishe Smith.

“The delay just made me even hungrier heading into this fight,” said Harrison. “Watching Charlo the night we were supposed to go shine, and rejuvenate himself, it built up so much hunger in me. I’m tired of the talk and the noise. I’m ready to go.

“We’re looking to work smarter this time,” added Harrison. “I think everything I did before worked, but we want to make it even more decisive. The plan is to be more technically sound overall. You may see an early knockout. It’s tense between both parties. I’m pretty sure he wants to knock me out as much as I want to knock him out. Whoever has the best plan will win. But I’m by far the better athlete. Athlete for athlete it’s not even close. I’ll beat him in everything, running, basketball, football. My style is perfect for his style. He’s Shane Mosley to my Vernon Forrest. I’ll beat him every time I face him.”

It was an emotional night for Charlo (32-1, 16 KOs) the first time he fought Harrison. He and his twin brother, Jermall, the WBC Middleweight World Champion, were defending their titles on a FOX PBC Fight Night doubleheader at Barclays Center in Brooklyn. Jermell and many ringside observers thought he had done enough to beat Harrison, but the judges saw it differently, handing Harrison a unanimous decision victory and setting up a hotly contested rematch.

A 29-year-old native of Houston, Texas, Charlo, won the title with a knockout victory over John Jackson in 2016. He went on to establish himself as one of the best young finishers in the sport with devastating stoppage victories over Charles Hatley and Erickson Lubin in defense of the title. He scored a majority decision over former world champion Austin Trout before taking on Harrison and most recently scored a knockout victory over Jorge Cota on FOX in June.

“I still feel strongly that I won that first fight and I’m going to do things in a more dominant fashion this time,” said Charlo. “I’m coming in to this fight being the overpowering, strong, ferocious Jermell Charlo. Tony Harrison is not on my level. It’s my job on December 21 to prove that and to prove my worth. I’m coming in there mentally focused. When I fought Jorge Cota, that’s a prelim of what’s to be expected from me in the future.

“I want to look for the knockout and set it up,” continued Charlo. “I don’t want it to go the judges. That’s my worst nightmare. If it does go 12 rounds, he’s going to be very injured at the end. The loss taught me how to be more patient and to take things step-by-step. I’m going to show everyone why Jermell Charlo is a threat to the whole 154-pound division. I personally feel I’m the best in the division. I’m an upgraded Jermell Charlo that you’ll see on December 21.”

Alvarez-Seals set for 1/18

Two of the light heavyweight’s division’s most explosive fighters are set for a fistic shootout Saturday, Jan. 18, as former world champion Eleider “Storm” Alvarez will face Michael “Cannon Handz” Seals at Turning Stone Resort Casino.

The 10-round showdown will be contested for the vacant WBC Continental Americas title, and the winner is expected to challenge for a world title in 2020.

Alvarez-Seals and a co-feature will stream live and exclusively on ESPN+, the leading multi-sport streaming service, beginning at 10 p.m. ET/7 p.m. PT. Undercard bouts will stream live on ESPN+ starting at 6:30 p.m. ET/3:30 p.m. PT.

“This is a fantastic fight, a true 50-50 matchup featuring two of the division’s best punchers,” said Top Rank chairman Bob Arum. “The light heavyweight division is on fire right now, and the winner will be in a tremendous position.”

“I am very happy to get back in the ring after this long layoff,” Alvarez said. “I am looking at Jan. 18 to reboot my career against a strong puncher, Michael Seals, and begin my campaign to once again be on top of the boxing world. I have a lot of respect for my opponent, but in 2020, nothing will stop me from becoming a world champion again.”

“First, I would like to thank Top Rank and ESPN for giving Eleider this opportunity, as well as a plan to be very active in 2020,” said Yvon Michel, Alvarez’s co-promoter. “Eleider had a great run before his last fight, beating three former or current world champions in a row: Lucian Bute, Jean Pascal and Sergey Kovalev. The defeat in his rematch with Kovalev was very painful, but also a great learning lesson. Eleider Alvarez belongs with the elite of the light heavyweight division, and he will prove it starting Jan. 18 in Verona.”

“Uncle Bob and Brad Goodman are giving me the opportunity of a lifetime, and I am going to put on a show for them,” Seals said. “Everyone knows that going the distance is against my religion. I’m going to bring the heat, and that’s no secret. Alvarez made a huge mistake in accepting me for his ‘comeback fight.’ When you sign a contract with me, I’m trying to force-feed you some ZzzQuil. This is a tune-up for him but everything for me. I’m not an opponent for the top fighters. I am a top fighter. I want a world title shot, and I won’t let this guy get in the way. He had his time. It’s my time.”

Alvarez (24-1, 12 KOs), the Colombian-born, Montreal-based boxer-puncher has not fought since Feb. 2, when he dropped a unanimous decision to Sergey Kovalev six months after knocking him out to win the WBO light heavyweight world title. Alvarez’s long layoff is due to a torn foot ligament he suffered in training earlier this year. He hopes a win over Seals will earn him another crack at world championship glory.

Seals (24-2, 18 KOs), a Mobile, Alabama, native who played collegiate football at Alabama A&M, is still one of the division’s heaviest hitters at 37 years of age. An 11-year pro, Seals has been involved in many memorable brawls, including a 2015 Fight of the Year contender versus Edwin Rodriguez that included five knockdowns in three rounds. Despite falling short versus Rodriguez, Seals’ reputation as a fan-friendly fighter was solidified. He has won four in a row, including three by knockout in either the first or second round. He is coming off a one-punch, first-round knockout Oct. 18 in Philadelphia against Elio Trosch.

Canelo on going back to 160: ‘It will probably be very difficult to lose weight’

Canelo Alvarez has done it again. Last night in Las Vegas, he knocked out Sergey Kovalev in round 11 to capture the WBO light heavyweight title. With the victory, Alvarez becomes a four-division world champion.

For most of the fight, it seemed that Kovalev was in control. Still, according to the scorecards at the time of the knockout, Canelo was ahead 96-94 on two scorecards, and the third scorecard was 95-95.

CaneloKovalev_Hoganphotos3.jpg

Coming into the fight, the talk was that Alvarez was going to try to go to Kovalev’s body, but as we saw, the fight ended with Alvarez landing to the head.

“I said in past interviews that was the intention to go to the body,” Alvarez said at the post-fight press conference. “However, once you are there, that’s when other strategies must be in place. It was hard to get to his body; it was unpredictable. It was toward the face that we won.”

What’s next for the 29-year-old Alvarez? He could stay at 175 and fight unified light heavyweight champion Artur Bertibiev, or maybe he could go after WBA light heavyweight champion Dmitry Bivol; perhaps he goes down to 168, where he holds a secondary belt and goes after some of the big names in that division, or does he go down 15 pounds to 160, and do a third fight with IBF middleweight champion Gennady Golovkin or try to unify against WBO middleweight champion Demetrius Andrade? 

Who knows, but according to Alvarez, he seems willing to continue to make history and do big things at 160.

“It will probably be very difficult to lose weight,” Alvarez said about going to 160. “It’s always been very difficult for me to lose weight. However, we must continue creating history; I can do it.”

Obviously, when you are Canelo Alvarez, you have options. It would seem that going back down to 160 could be difficult, but Alvarez seems willing to do it. The biggest fight for Alvarez is against Golovkin. However, maybe he wants to do that fight at 168, which could make the most sense for both fighters. In the end, when you are Canelo, well, you could do whatever you like.

Photos: Golden Boy Promotions

Berchelt on Valdez: ‘If he wants this belt, come and get it’

Miguel Berchelt defended his WBC super featherweight world title for a sixth time, stopping the game but overmatched former world champion Jason Sosa in the fourth round at Dignity Health Sports Park.

Berchelt (37-1, 33 KOs) knocked down Sosa (23-4-4, 16 KOs) in the second round and kept the pressure coming, ultimately forcing a corner stoppage with four seconds left in the fourth.

Berchelt has his eyes on lucky defense number seven, and former featherweight world champion Oscar Valdez is on his radar.

“It was a great performance. I want to congratulate Jason,” Berchelt said. “He came to put on a great fight, and I have a lot of love for him.

“I want to wait until Valdez fights on Nov. 30. If he wants this belt, come and get it.”

Said Sosa: “He’s a great champion. He’s defended it six times. He has serious power.”

Molina KOs Okada

Javier Molina (21-2, 9 KOs) seized the moment. The 2008 U.S. Olympian knocked down Hiroki Okada twice and scored the knockout only 65 seconds into the scheduled 10-round super lightweight fight. Molina knocked down Okada (19-2, 13 KOs) with a left hook in the opening minute, then finished things off with an overhand right.

Molina-Okada was elevated to co-feature status Thursday after Jonathan Rodriguez’s visa issue forced the cancellation of his junior bantamweight title challenge against IBF kingpin Jerwin Ancajas.

“I caught him early. When I had him hurt, I jumped on him,” Molina said. “Whoever’s next, we want to go for a world title. I showed everyone what I’m made of. This was my moment.”

— The return of super lightweight Alex “El Cholo” Saucedo (29-1, 19 KOs) was a triumphant one, as the former world title challenger knocked out Rod Salka (24-6, 4 KOs) with a left hook to the body in the opening round. This was the first fight for Saucedo since falling short to then-champion Maurice Hooker nearly one year ago.

“It was great to be back. I wanted to get some rounds in, but the knockout came, so it is what it is,” Saucedo said. “I hope to be back in the ring very soon.”

— Crowd favorite Raymond “Danger” Muratalla (9-0, 7 KOs), from nearby Fontana, Calif., knocked out fellow Californian Arnulfo Becerra (7-3, 5 KOs) in the fifth round of a lightweight fight.

— Australian prospect Daniel Lewis (5-0, 3 KOs) cruised to an eight-round decision over Alexis Gaytan (6-5, 2 KOs) in his American debut. Scores for the middleweight bout were as followed: 80-72 2X and 79-73.

— In a fight featuring a pair of unbeaten super lightweights, Abram Martinez (8-0, 6 KOs) dropped Ruben Rodriguez (9-1, 3 KOs) twice in the third round en route to the stoppage.

— Freddie Roach-trained welterweight prospect Gor Yeritsyan (12-0, 10 KOs) defeated Shoki Sakai (23-11-2, 13 KOs) by eight-round unanimous decision (80-72, 79-73 and 77-75).

— Elvis “The Dominican Kid” Rodriguez (5-0-1, 5 KOs) opened the evening in fine fashion, knocking out Chilean veteran Luis Norambuena (4-5-1, 0 KOs) in the fourth-round of a scheduled six-round super lightweight bout.

Photo: Mikey Williams/Top Rank